Palimps, palimpser, palimpsest

Chani’s been all over my case lately:

At first it was nice for my ruins to be acknowledged FOR THEY ARE LEGENDARY but she just kept hammering on it, day after goddamn day. (You can stop reading after that part though. The anxiety thing is bullshit; it’s called homeostasis — your living system seeking a dynamic equilibrium — NOT pathology. The only unstimulated/unsoothed nervous system is a dead one.)

Uhh I mean, astrology is bullshit and so am I for reading it, but maybe not all of neuroscience is, says the person with a large brain tattoo on their arm.

Anyway.

Yesterday, I started noticing. Fading pasts, futures birthing, etc.

On the way to lunch.
At lunch.
Even the lunch itself, which was advertised as this…
…then was served thus. And tasted fantastic. I let the counter guy pick my fry sauce and he went with Miami, which turned out to be…half orange pudding, half mayo, a little onion powder and a lot of celery salt?

And then the Chief looked even worse, immediately after, in the WC. Ahem.

There are no pictures of that phase — pre-use! jfc — even though I DEARLY wanted to take one: it was the first time since arriving that I’d finally encountered one of the classic German shelf toilets.

I’d restarted my no-cell-signal phone while dining, forgetting that the SIM PIN lock would then be on — and that my SIM PIN was 45 min away at home. So no phone, for the next 5+ hours, until I returned.

My past might be fading*, but doing stupid inconvenient shit will always be here for me.

*It’s not. I fully agree with Faulkner’s oft-quoted observation that “The past is never dead. It’s not even past.”

And also with Bessel Van Der Kolk’s longer version:

We have learned that trauma is not just an event that took place sometime in the past; it is also the imprint left by that experience on mind, brain, and body. This imprint has ongoing consequences for how the human organism manages to survive in the present. Trauma results in a fundamental reorganization of the way mind and brain manage perceptions. It changes not only how we think and what we think about, but also our very capacity to think.”

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